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20121108
20121108
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're obviously part of the california district attorney's association, as we were talking before the panel began, you shared with me that your organization has previously supported a measure that mark leno brought forward to lower the punishment for possession of less than an ounce of marijuana to a misdemeanor to an infraction. in this case your organization is essentially opposed to it. what do you say to mr. adelman and mr. gascon? >> i think one of the things i want to point out is that in terms of the changes currently taking place in california's criminal justice system is that we have embarked on a very, very large experiment and that's called realignment. prison population in california is going to approach by -- or sometime next year the federal mandate of 130,000. we've already released some 50,000 individuals to serve their time locally, and these offenses that we were talking about here are currently in the list of offenses that were to be served in county jails now. and if the notion here is to provide services and treatment to these individuals from a practical point of view, and i
area, and along the coast of california, and it allows local organizations and agencies to leverage their local funds, and make those funds go even further through the application of state bond dollars. the conservancy had a great interest for a long time in improving wildlife habitat and public access to the san francisco bay here in southeast san francisco. we partnered with the bay trail, the port of san francisco, literacy for environmental justice, and many other organizations and agencies to develop the heron's head park, to build the heron's head eco center, and now to plan and construct the bike path and this really grand entrance to heron's head. it's completed a really critical gap in the san francisco bay trail which is a regional trail that circles the entire san francisco bay. it's about 300 miles of it are done of a planned 500-mile loop. for this project really fits perfectly with our vision to improve access to the san francisco bay and to the california coast, to restore wetland throughout the state and complete the trail in the bay area and i want to thank a fe
outside of a facility with high scrutiny than it is to incarcerate. as you probably know, california spends about eight times as much money for every inmate as it does for every student in the university of california system. and so you could reorganize those resources and put they will more towards supervision and other types of things and manage a lot of those individuals that are currently incarcerated in a much more effective way that is going to save you tax dollars but also reduce the chance that they'll continue to spiral into those, like the stories we heard earlier today. [applause] >> if i could add one quick thought that ties with the first panel and this panel. it's the question of resource allocation. the point needs to be taken quite seriously especially with adolescents. if you get the diagnosis and the community is not ready to step up and do the interventions that are more humane, then the inhumane alternatives may end up costing more but being the easy political solution. >> i think we're out of time. i would like to thank everyone on the panel for their time.. >> t
am proud to say that this is the ninth summit. we take on issues like closing the california youth authority. and we in the confinement of youth -- young children in -- and the prisoner re-entry program and abolishing the death penalty. we take on three critical issues. the first panel has a riveting discussion about gangs. and reducing gang violence. on our panel are former gang members, gang intervention workers, police, public defenders, and researchers. we talk about strategies to reduce gang violence. i will introduce the keynote speaker in a moment. the second panel is a cutting edge -- cutting edge discussion about the relationship between the human brain and criminal behavior. we have top experts from all parts of the country to talk about what the brain research shows. that is the key to understanding how human beings behave, and why they may commit acts of violence. the afternoon's panel will have a debate about a proposed law that would reduce felony drug possession crimes to a misdemeanor. this is what 13 states have done. we not only bring these issues to the forefront
importance to the state of california and to the nation. of course we have the opportunity to yet again lead the way here in california. we're offering a bill this year, s.b.-1506 which would redefine the crime of simple possession of a drug from felony to misdemeanor. there are 13 other states, and the federal government which already do this and in the 13 other states, we have the data that shows that we get better results, better outcomes, meaning safer communities, and surprisingly the states include not only the large eastern states of pennsylvania and new york, but also states like mississippi, south carolina, west virginia, wyoming, iowa, all of which use this mid deem charge rather than felony. and what we find in these 13 other states is that there are higher rates of drug treatment participation, lower rates of drug use, and even slightly lower rates of violent and property crime. so again, we can prove we can have safer communities. and then of course there are the unintended consequences of a felony conviction. consequences that really can cause great damage to a young life for m
and made it possible for this to be watched all over northern california. all right. are you ready now? we can really get it started. [cheers and applause] . i said are you ready? [cheers and applause] it is my pleasure now to introduce two members of the best broadcast team in baseball. please welcome dave fleming and john miller. >> now, all along the parade route this song that echoed through the ballpark and my broadcast partner on the radio dave fleming somehow has involuntary reaction to it. a lot of people think he's so into it. whenever the music comes on he can't contain himself. it's not even that and i'm going to show you it right now. >> i'm not sure where you're going with this john. >> it's uncontrollable for him so he's not really into even the thought of it but i want to show you what really happens. we seen him do it so many times in the ballpark. along the parade route they were pleading for him to do it. >> i don't know. >> so really -- now keep your eyes on dave. watch what happens when i say "oh gangom style". >> john, can do it with me too. >> okay, okay. i ca
on the fight here in california to bring to the california medical association and ultimately to the nation the san francisco model and how we were going to care for our people here in san francisco. there was not going to be discrimination. there was going to be full access to all care that our citizens and our residents needed here, whatever the problem was. and we were going to fight aids. i've been privileged over these last 20 some odd years to also being able to assist with the city's policies and regards to being a member of the health commission. and i am so proud that today we're seeing the culmination of research facilities that as mayor lee has pointed out will become part of our world class innovation for san francisco. so, coming from trying to serve individuals who had aids all the way to the final answer, as i heard dr. bookbinder tell us that the health commission was on the verge of what i hope was in this building we're going to be able to do, we from the health commission are extremely proud that our city has been able to be at the forefront on a national and world level.
, celebrating san francisco. opera iit is often said that as goes san francisco, goes california. as those california, so goes the rest of the country. i want to thank the awardees tonight and all of our civil servants when you are helping us how to figure out how to better manage our parks, r-texas, to figure out how we deliver our water. we are setting in example truly to the rest of the world. i want to thank spur. i know that the best ideas in city government do not come from the politicians. they come from all of you. i want to thank spur for helping to convene not just the smartest people in san francisco, but the smartest people from around the world to help us figure out how to innovate. it is my honor to introduce the first award thee of this evenin. this is a very unique award. this is the lifetime achievement award. mfac has to select one individual out of 26,000 who best exemplifies what service is to our city. when i was first elected to office, i asked a lot of people, literally hundreds of people, who is the smartest person in government. with all due respect to the other sm
of the criminal rampage that began in irvine, california. he used a firearm to rob to banks in southern california, of threatening to shoot the tellers if they did not comply. gave no consideration to anyone who got in the way of his criminal ambition or effort to escape. as a direct result of his disregard for anyone who might come in to counter with his criminal endeavors, and as well as san francisco police officer lives were jeopardized. the suspect complete disregard for the public put a great risk any person who might inadvertently cross his path, should he escape from the park. searchers got ryan, rubin reyes recognize the danger. even when faced with serious bodily injury or death, these officers remain steadfast and determined to protect not only themselves and one another, but the public at large from the disregard of the fleeing fugitive. sir john ryan, officer lou andrelieu and reyes , when confd with a violent situation, they responded with no were the bravery and poise. they were fully responsible to the danger, but to the rapidly- devolving life-threatening circumstances that unfold
was with also in richmond california to looking at the different levels of chemicals, diesel exhaust in richmond which you would expect to be very different, and she's going to help us see if we can build a study, so this was a great thing that you brought to our attention. >> i start to think about it over the years but especially working in an airport and now in an actively working diesel pump station. >> and it's not something you have any control over, and that's the same kind of fragmentation we're seeing at all levels, it's hard to make changes when jurisdictions move. >> but if i could get her contact information or something after the presentation, that would be great. >> okay, cool. >> i had two questions, one is you were just saying to use glass when you're cooking or microwave, what about -- i was told before that you could use plastic for the refrigerator or storage, are you saying avoid plastics all together for food storage, and then the second question is water bottles, say for instance i have a case of like costco water in my trunk that i just keep, is it the heat that's leechi
, california and hopefully others will adopt these very progressive and positive reinforcement model kind of treatment programs. and they have the power to reduce impulsivity and increase a little bit of empathy that allows that person when they're released to not act without thinking or to act less likely to act without thinking, and then to also potentially engage in better, general better societyal behaviors. >> you briefly mentioned mitigation and aggravation. professor, can you address the question of how you would use this information either as aggravation or mitigation in a death personality case? do you have any opinions about that? >> a couple observations. first it's worth noting that most jurisdictions, the rules of evidence, whether it's the kelly test in california or the due better rule in federal jurisdictions does not apply at capital sentencing. so many of the questions about how valid the research is and how robust it is doesn't necessarily come up because the standards are much lower in capital sentencing. it's a huge question. you could have exactly the same brain scan
two incidents that occurred in irvine, california. an armed white male suspects driving a gray bmw had committed to armed bank robberies. the suspect had already proven himself dangerous and desperate when he attempted to run down responding deputy sheriffs in order to effectively escape from one of the bank robberies. using the gps, the getaway car was located in our city at one of this the park. -- beuna vista park. the suspects gray bmw was found precisely with gps. the car was legally parked and unattended. the robbery abatement team maintain surveillance of the -- of the vehicle for hours, but no signs of activity. park station please -- plain clothes officer under the direction of sergeant scott ryan and robert lieu adnd reyes observed. they noticed until lights were on and the sun roof was opened. officer lew quickly executed a u-turn and confirmed it was occupied by the suspect. officers immediately got out of the car, drew their weapons and began giving verbal commands. they identified themselves, told a suspect he was under arrest and ordered them to surrender. the officers i
for california pacific medical center, please welcome judy lee. judy. (applause). >> good morning. i've learned a lot this morning nr tim and john and i think the most personally relevant to me is john's comments about the mortgage rate hitting the all-time low. so i think i'm going to have it call my husband and take that refi offer during the break. but back to the agenda. since becoming mayor, at lee has prioritized job grow *t and making san francisco the innovation capital of the world. and the chamber has worked very closely with the mayor on a number of initiatives, one that we're very proud of is the midmarket payroll tax initiatives. that is to make san francisco much more attracttive to entrepreneurial companies and renovate a blighted area. we're particularly proud of this kind of public-private partnership to move the city forward. now join me in welcoming the city's first asian american mayor and i'm very proud to say a member of the lee tribe, the 43rd mayor of san francisco, ed lee. (applause). >> thank you, judy, very much for that introduction. good morning, everyone. >> go
soap and water. fire stations in california have much higher levels in their dust than do california residences or other kinds of industries like electronic breakdown industry or airplane industry, so you have high levels of this flame retardant in fire station, i don't think anybody knows where that's coming from but it would be interesting to do some kind of studies trying to figure out the sources of these so-called fire retardants, there is not enough in these chairs to stop fire, sitting on this chair would be like sitting on a bunch of geographic, be really uncomfortable and cost a lot, so i think there's a lot of interesting thing that is can happen in the fire department. i thank the breast cancer fund because i learned a lot from your presentation, i work at common bhaoel and we do a three day intensive training on breast cancer and environmental health and we want to work with you all to develop a training with the breast cancer fund on those chemicals that firefighters are specifically exposed to nr the course of feting a fire which has to do with insulation and houses, di
and of san francisco and the bay area and california broadly. (applause) >> you know, it's an honor to get up here and represent my boss, secretary kathleen sebelius and be like brandt colfax, another round of applause for dr. colfax, please. (applause) >> to have a reinvest and recovery act, our stimulus law with the leadership of leader pelosi, of our mayor, of our supervisors, and our community to have $9-1/2 million given to this city and to this area for this. but not just for this, but everybody's already setting this this morning, the local impact, the state impact, the national impact, and indeed the international impact. and i represent a region that is 50 million people. california, arizona, nevada, hawaii, it's a three territories and three countries in the pacific. and i could tell you that i have moved around my region. i've been working with the hiv/aids and other communities throughout our region. do you know how many people have said to me, i got my information through san francisco? (applause) >> that is something to be really proud of. you know, i'll tell you a little bit of
of baseball, san francisco california. i think people forgot this team won 94 games in the regular season in a division that is probably as under rated as any division in sports. beat two excellent teams to win the national league and go on to detroit and unfortunately with detroit with all due respect they didn't know what they were in for. [cheers and applause] you fans, this city, this organization, this team wants all of us, or tries to make all of us better men, better people, better husbands, better friends. larry alluded to it the life lessons watching these guys perform everyday and we have a phrase for it "feeding the beast". this game is a rugged game and like life you need to put a lot into it and they became teammates and competed like nobody has seen. i am humbled to be part of this. i am so happy for all our family and friends and this is why we do this, and you folks will be etched in time and in history as one of the greatest teams not only in san francisco history but in baseball. [cheers and applause] . you earned it and you couldn't have done it without a hall of fa
. [applause] >> i graduated from the university of california berkeley with a degree in civil engineering. i started with the department of public works in 1984. in 2003, i was asked to come to san francisco public utilities commission to take the meat on the program. i'm responsible for all the large capital projects for water, waste water, and power. it's about $12 billion of capital projects. we have a lot of projects. our water system improvement program, 80 products that span seven counties. we have a staff of about 400 city employees and about 500 consultants. puc is really embracing technology. we wanted to make sure we really had a system that would elevate all issues so we could address them in a timely manner. as you know, time is money. we have a construction management information system. it is a great tool to help us address construction and make it successful, as it is today. cmis is one of the first major tools we put in place. the next one is the san francisco online invoicing, where we are now working with the contractor and consultant to have them submit their invoices onli
and it has more impact than probably any other county in state of california because of that fact. and also because in terms of land use issues, they have the ability to alter our decisions and reverse them. and we are dependent upon them for our confirmation, as i found out earlier this year and i knew all along the other three times. and there are some reasons i think that the system may need to be revisited. the whole idea of rank choice voting on three basis. number one, the basis of cost. number two, the basis of increasing the turnout of voters in a runoff election or in lieu of runoff the rank choice thing. and thirdly, this has more to do with district elections making the decisions reflective of the values of the people in the particular districts. in terms of cost, i think there's no reason why you couldn't utilize the june primary which could be proposed in the future. there's always a june primary in even years because you have state and federal elections that have a primary and then you could have your final election in november and you'd also have the ability to, instead of ha
the projects could use cdlac which is the california debt allocation committee bond financing available with the state particularly coupled with 4% tax credit to build their inclusionary unit, as long as they built more units and at a deeper level of afford ability. the reason we allowed that funding is because it's less competitive than other funding. we felt there was plenty of it out there and also we're getting more units at deeper affordability. we went ahead in 2010 and exempted these projects from inclusionary housing program thinking that their monitoring procedures were too much in conflict and learned after that there is no reason to exempt them, we can handle it. and their procedures can be synchronized. but more importantly, we don't want to lose the long-term affordability of these units. this is 4% tax credit unit are not restricted for a longer period as the inclusionary units. the inclusionary units are now restricted for the life of the project. so until the building crumbles and the others are not. we want to bring it back: the next is the conversion of rental to owner
this out myself. you may have a threshold in another city in california, in your first unit you're paying a fee. we're already talking about doing on-site. we started at 5 and now potentially we go back to 10. currently we're at 5 units or more are subject to the program. but they don't produce much. for how much we have and how much we produce, i have a feeling we're producing more than most, even most large cities. >> let me just comment. i think it's really your due diligence and thoroughness including your transparency because the issues being discussed all the time. you are creating a level of public acceptance, which really kind of unique to the city and i think that's where success lies. * which is you're not bringing in people pulling them by the hair to the table as an obligation. it is something that needs to be done as part of the standard of discussion. part of the strength of where this comes from [speaker not understood]. thank you. >> i want to thank you. this is obviously a lot of use of information you have internally and institutionally, to spit it back out in half an h
of northern california, chinatown development community center regarding their concern over the project. during the course of these concerns, the project sponsor has tried to work with the neighbors in opposition and basically have modified their proposal in regards to the hours of operation and also clarified that there would not be any recorded or live music they have indicated they would clean the patio nightly. [speaker not understood] also submitted a letter or e-mail in response this morning to these concerns and also tried to contact the residents regarding clarification on the proposal. the department adam smallman recommendation is approve the conditions [speaker not understood]. they also include hours of operation of the outdoor activity area to 10:00 p.m. also reducing noise by prohibiting [speaker not understood], and not allowing music in the upper space and adding signage for patrons to dine quietly within the rear dining patio to respect residential neighbors. this concludes my presentation and i'm available to answer any questions. thank you. >> thank you. project spons
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21

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